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Delphes - aurige (detail) ()

Un aurige est un conducteur de char de course, dans le contexte gréco-romain.
Le plus célèbre de tous est l'aurige de Delphes, une statue de bronze découverte sur le sanctuaire de Delphes à la fin du xixe siècle, conservée au musée archéologique de Delphes. Il s'agit d'une commande honorifique pour un conducteur de char vainqueur aux jeux Pythiques de 478 av. J.-C. L'Aurige a les yeux incrustés d'émail et de pierres colorées.
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Delphes - aurige ()

Un aurige est un conducteur de char de course, dans le contexte gréco-romain.
Le plus célèbre de tous est l'aurige de Delphes, une statue de bronze découverte sur le sanctuaire de Delphes à la fin du xixe siècle, conservée au musée archéologique de Delphes. Il s'agit d'une commande honorifique pour un conducteur de char vainqueur aux jeux Pythiques de 478 av. J.-C. L'Aurige a les yeux incrustés d'émail et de pierres colorées.
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Horse Without A Rider. Around 490 BC ()

The sculpture was dedicated to the sanctuary of the Acropolis, possibly on the occasion of a victory in an equestrian contest (race of 'keletes'). Marble from the island of Paros.
Acropolis Museum Archaic Gallery. Horse Without A Rider. Around 490 BCDetails Unknown.jpg



Relief Of The Pensive Athena. Around 460 BC ()

Athena is presented in front of a stele leaning on her spear in a relaxed manner. The stele has been variously interpreted either as a boundary marker of a sanctuary, a catalogue of treasures or a list of war casualties. Marble from the island of Paros.
Acropolis Museum Archaic Gallery. Relief Of The Pensive Athena. Around 460 BCDetails Unknown.jpg



Sanctuary of Dionysos. Female Dancer. 1st Cent. BC ()

Ιt is probably one of the Horai, daughters of Zeus and Themis, who represented the seasons of the year. The slab probably decorated a triangular tripod base.
Acropolis Museum Gallery of the Slopes of the Acropolis. Sanctuary of Dionysos. Female Dancer. 1st Cent. BCDetails Unknown.jpg



Sanctuary of Nymphe. Dedication To Nymphe, Protectress Of Marriage. 6th Cent. BC ()

Painted clay tablet depicting a doe with her fawns, dedicated to the Sanctuary of Nymphe, protectress of marriage.
Acropolis Museum Gallery of the Slopes of the Acropolis. Sanctuary of Nymphe. Dedication To Nymphe, Protectress Of Marriage. 6th Cent. BCDetails Unknown.jpg



Parthenon Gallery, west frieze. Block IX Of The West Frieze. 442-438 BC ()

Two horsemen galloping. A rider is depicted on a trotting horse. Another horseman with a broad-brimmed hat (petasos) rides a proud, galloping horse. Traces of green color have been found in the folds of the rider’s cape (chlamys), whereas the corner containing the horse’s hind legs was identified among the fragments from the storerooms and restored.
Acropolis Museum Parthenon Gallery, west frieze. Block IX Of The West Frieze. 442-438 BCDetails Pheidias Workshop.jpg



Parthenon Gallery, west frieze. Block VIII Of The West Frieze. 442-438 BC ()

Depiction of a rider trying to control his runaway horse. This powerful composition occupies the central block of the west frieze, which is possibly the work of Pheidias. It has been suggested that the rider is one of the two Athenian Cavalry commanders. Marble from the mount Penteli.
Acropolis Museum Parthenon Gallery, west frieze. Block VIII Of The West Frieze. 442-438 BCDetails Pheidias Workshop.jpg



Temple of Athena Nike. The Goddess Athena Seated On A Rock. Around 410 BC ()

The Goddess Athena is resting after victorious battles. Part of the decorated parapet that surrounded the temple.
Acropolis Museum Temple of Athena Nike. The Goddess Athena Seated On A Rock. Around 410 BCDetails Unknown.jpg



Masque d'Agamemnon ()

Le « masque d'Agamemnon » est un masque funéraire en or, découvert à Mycènes en 1876 par Heinrich Schliemann dans un lieu qui s'avérera par la suite être une tombe à fosse. Selon la tradition, Schliemann croyait avoir découvert le corps du légendaire Agamemnon, chef des Achéens dans le cycle troyen, d'où le nom habituellement donné au masque. Cependant, les recherches de l'archéologie moderne laissent à penser que le masque date de 1550-1500 av. J.-C., plusieurs siècles avant la date supposée de la guerre de Troie. Le nom est néanmoins resté.
Le masque est actuellement exposé au Musée national archéologique d'Athènes
Agamemnon Mask. Date unknown. Gold. National Archeological Museum, Athens.jpg



Life and Death in Rome Medea Sarcophagus 140 BCE ()

Altes Museum, Berlin | Etruscan and Roman Art | Life and Death in Rome Medea Sarcophagus 140 BCEDetails Unknown.jpg



Alexander and the Outcome - The Age of Hellenism Clay Figurine Of Aphrodite 2nd Century ()

Altes Museum, Berlin | Greek Art | Alexander and the Outcome - The Age of Hellenism Clay Figurine Of Aphrodite 2nd Century BCEDetails Unknown.jpg



Myrina - Aphrodite ()

This depiction of Aphrodite is characterised by a rare sensuality. Her gown is draped low, just covering the right breast while the fineness of the fabric reveals more of the abdomen than it conceals. The hair is fastened at the back of the head and crowned with a diadem. The goddess has also been adorned with large earrings. The attitude of the deity’s posture is difficult to interpret as her attributes have been lost. The turn of the head away from the object in her hands suggests there may have been a complementary figure standing there, such as a small cupid. The raised left leg indicates that it once stood on a plinth or a larger structure like a column. The front of the statue was formed in a mould and then retouched; the rear has been fairly neglected in comparison. The wrinkles of skin on the neck have been sharply drawn; pupils were indicated in the eyes by small hollows. A large, oval hole in the back of the statuette near the waist used for the firing process tells us more about how it was made. The statue probably stems from Myrina in Asia Minor, a town that like Tanagra was famous for its terracotta. Its heyday came a little later though and it is from here that we have examples of clay figurines from the late Hellenistic period in the second century BCE.
Altes Museum, Berlin | Greek Art | Alexander and the Outcome - The Age of Hellenism Clay figurine of Aphrodite 2nd century BCEDetails Unknown.jpg



Troies - quadrige (Metope du temple Athena) ()

Troy, in Homer the city of Ilos, later named Ilion by the Greeks, was already a place of mythical and monumental significance in ancient times. At the beginning of the third century BC, acting on a wish of Alexander the Great, Lysimachus, King of Thrace and Macedonia, built a new Doric marble temple for the city’s goddess, Athena. Later it was renovated and given a dedicatory inscription by the Roman Emperor Augustus. The corner block of a metope-triglyph frieze shown here came from the north-eastern corner of the Hellenistic temple to Athena and was found by Schliemann at the start of his famous excavation of Troy. The relief, depicting the quadriga of Helios rising from the sea, was the first of the series of metope scenes on the north side of the temple. The Helios relief quotes an iconographic motif from classical Greek art. From around 500 BC, Greek artists began to link representations of the Olympian gods with a ‘background’ from elemental nature. On the Parthenon in Athens, the birth of Athena on the east gable is framed by the rising chariot of Helios and the sinking of Selene (the Moon goddess). Reliefs with images of the Trojan wars on the northern metopes of the Parthenon were enclosed by similar images. We may probably assume that scenes from the Trojan Wars were also depicted on further metopes from the temple of Athena in Illion. Following classical models, the almost square relief of the metope in Berlin depicts the chariot of the sun god at the very moment when it emerges from the ocean. The hind legs of the horses, whose staggered diagonal forms dominate the picture space, are only just still in contact with a rocky cliff, while their front quarters, with tossing heads and widely-stretching hooves rear up and seem to burst their architectural frame with the dynamism of their movement. Behind the horses, in a fluttering robe, stands the charioteer, Helios, his youthful head, with flowing locks, nimbus and a double rayed crown, breaking through the upper border of the metope. As well as the freely-worked portions of the relief which were lost when the block fell, imagination must supply the ancient paintwork which not only contributed a dimension of colour but also served to indicate the chariot, harness, and reins.
Altes Museum, Berlin | Greek Art | Alexander and the Outcome - The Age of Hellenism Metope relief of the sun god Helios After 300 BCEDetails Unknown.jpg



Altes Museum, Berlin | Greek Art | Alexander and the Outcome – The Age of Hellenism Clay Figurine Of Aphrodite 2nd Century BCEDetails Unknown.jpg



Athena. Date unknown. Marble. h. 173 cm ()

Athena. Date unknown. Marble. h. 173 cm (5 1:2 ft). Liebighaus Museum, Frankfurt.jpg



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Belvedere Apollo. Date unknown. Marble. h. 2.24 m (7 ft). Pio Clementino Museum, Vatican.jpg



Discobolos. c. 450. Marble. h. 155 cm ()

Discobolos. c. 450. Marble. h. 155 cm (61 in). Museo Nazionale Romano, Rome.jpg



Hagesandros, Athenodoros and Polydoros of Rhodes. Date unknown. Marble. h. 242 cm ()

Hagesandros, Athenodoros and Polydoros of Rhodes. Date unknown. Marble. h. 242 cm (95 1:2 in). Museo Pio Clementino, Vatican.jpg



Air-Goddess -397 ()

In the static marble sculpture the garment conveys movement such as running and floating by rendering the fabric as clinging to the body. A young woman in a thin transparent garment comes floating towards the viewer. The floating motif is emphasized by the forward tilt of the body. The statue was made for a high placement. The figure must have stood on the apex of a Greek temple pediment. Most of the Classical marble sculptures preserved were elements of architectural ornamentation. The sculptor probably enjoyed emphasising the sensual feminine body which is more voluptuous than is usual in Greek classical sculpture.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek Air-Goddess -397Details Unknown artist.jpg



Artemis And Iphigenia (-298 -97) ()

The story goes that King Agamemnon had to sacrifice his daughter Iphigeneia to the goddess Artemis in order to have a favourable wind for Troy. The story is well known from Greek myths and from the tragedy “Iphigeneia in Aulis” by Euripides from the 400s BC. The statue group shows the goddess Artemis, who at the last minute saves the young girl Iphigeneia, by dragging her away from the altar on which she is about to be sacrificed. Artemis grabs the antlers of a deer and hauls the animal into her place. In this representation in marble the statue of the goddess was originally covered entirely in gold leaf, while Iphigeneia’s dress was painted in vivid colours. The statue came from Turkey, but was found in a park, the so-called Garden of Sallust, in ancient Rome in which the emperors brought together works of art from various parts of the Empire, some legally obtained, others acquired by outright looting. This area became a kind of museum park, and the Glyptotek has several sculptures from the location.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek Artemis And Iphigenia (-298 - -97)Details Unknown artist.jpg



Attic Grave Relief (-358 -348) ()

The tombs of the Greeks were placed along the roads. Here the passers by could stop and read the names of the deceased. In a small building supported by columns and with a triangular pediment, a woman is shown seated on a backless chair, her feet resting on a stool. The inscription on the architrave tells us her name is Philostrate. She is shown shaking hands with a standing youth who is her son Hippon. The elderly bearded gentleman in the background is his father Agonippos from Piraeus whose hand is resting on the young man’s shoulder. The relief shows a strong bond between the parents and their son. The vase in the pediment indicates that he died unmarried.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek Attic Grave Relief (-358 - -348)Details Unknown artist.jpg



Athena Frieze C. 170 BC ()

The Pergamon Altar is the huge monument from which the Pergamon Museum takes its name. The fragments of this great Hellenistic altar of the second century BCE were found during excavations in Pergamon between 1878 and 1886. At the centre of the Altar Room stands a reconstruction of the west front of the Pergamon Altar. The large frieze, consisting of the original relief from the podium beneath the wings that projected on either side of the staircase, shows a battle between the gods and the giants. In the mythical Gigantomachy, or Battle of the Giants, the gods, guarantors of legitimate order, were attacked by the giants, children of Mother Earth and symbols of the chaos-inducing forces of nature. With the help of the hero Heracles, a human, the Gods would prove victorious. In the frieze the gods are grouped into 'families': in the east are the Olympians; in the south the gods of light and day; in the north the powers of war and fate; and in the west the circle of Dionysus and the gods of the sea. The part of the north wing of the altar shows Triton, son of Poseidon, with his powerful fishtail, together with his mother Amphitrite, doing battle with four giants. The goddess's opponent is identifiable as an earthly being by its serpent legs.
Pergamonmuseum, Berlin | Principal Floor | Pergamon Altar hall Pergamon Altar- Athena Frieze C. 170 BCEDetails Unknown.jpg



Roman architecture : Trajaneum hall Market Gate Of Miletus C. 100 ()

The gallery is dominated by the reconstruction of the market gate of Miletus, second only to the Pergamon Altar as the most important monument in the Collection of Antiquities at the Pergamon Museum and the only landmark of classical architecture that was rebuilt full-size inside the museum (28.92 x 6.66 m, h. 16.73 m). Unusually high, the proportion of original ancient marble work pieces is estimated to be over 60%. The two-story gate was erected in the early 2nd century AD as a magnificent gateway between two large squares, the agora and the so-called south market in the center of the rich trade city Miletus. Like most marble structures and sculptures of classical antiquity, the market gate was colored. The few remaining vestiges of paint are, however, not visible to the naked eye. In its original appearance, the market gate incorporated, like many Greek and Roman buildings, sculptures. Following extensive restoration, the two larger than life-sized statues of an emperor in a general’s armor with a subdued barbarian female at his feet and of a nude figure of hero holding a horn of plenty, statues that both, unfortunately, survived only in fragments, were mounted in the gate for the first time in 2009. Based on the current state of research, the originals were placed on either side of the central passage on the lower level. Prior to World War II, plaster casts of these sculptures stood in front of the niches on the upper level. The reconstruction of the gate inside the museum was achieved in 1928-9 with the aid of an enclosed iron support structure. During World War II the monument sustained severe bomb damage. The reconstruction undertaken in 1952/52 did not meet present-day standards in terms of materials selected, construction method and safety. In 2006-8, first restoration measures were therefore undertaken in the area of the three gables and the right upper-level aedicula. The second and final part of the restoration will be taken on in the course of the second construction phase of the overhaul of the museum building starting in 2019.
Pergamonmuseum, Berlin | Principal Floor | Roman architecture : Trajaneum hall Market Gate Of Miletus C. 100Details Unknown.jpg



Parrot Mosaic Early To Mid-2nd Century BC ()

This mosaic is a modern partial reconstruction incorporating original fragments that are easily identifiable among the extensive additions by their polychromy. Two elongated rectangular fields are framed on three sides by several borders: 1) a red (w. 2.5 cm) and 2) a green (w. 2.5 cm) band, 3) a rhombus frieze (w. 13.7 cm) in the colors blue, red, white and black with two eight-petaled flowers in the corners, 4) a green band (w. 2.2 cm), 5) a grey, sculpturally shaded bead and reel on a black ground (w. 5 cm) and 6) a red band (w. 1.8 cm). Inserted into the upper field (h. 66 cm) are three large figurative panels of equal size (w. 51.1 cm, h. 36.5 cm). The left shows a parrot facing right and perched on a cubical object. This emblema is a completed copy, made in 1955, of the original that survives only in fragments (Berlin, Pergamon Museum, Mos. 68). The two additional emblemata were completed without images. The upper register is separated from the lower one by a yellow-brown (w. 10.5 cm) and a grey-brown (w. 8 cm) band. On a bright ground, the latter (h. 47 cm) features a garland of two half and three full arcs that are tied together by four taeniae tied into bows. The half-garland on the left is made up of ivy leaves in various shades of green, red corymbs and a tuft of grass. The white taenia has brown trim. The next garland features yellow laurel leaves outlined in black with red berries, yellow-green ivy leaves, three large yellowish fruits and additional laurel leaves. Branches and wild roses project from the garland. Perched on a branch is a nightingale and cowering beneath the garland is a green woodpecker. The taenia tying this garland to the third, completed one is red with brown-black trim. The fragmented third garland features three round fruits with laurel and ivy leaves as well as a four-petaled flower. Perched on branch is a wheatear pecking at a butterfly. The taenia here has a yellow color with brown trim. The state of preservation of the mosaic at the time it was found is documented by photographs and sketches made by, respectively, August Senz and Richard Bohn. They serve as the basis for a new graphic reconstruction that shows the parts that were not included in the Berlin reconstruction and the places where it departs from the original findings. Thus the two images of a tragic and a comic mask (Berlin, Antikensammlung, Mos. 69 and 74) on either side of the marble base on the east side of the hall are missing. Furthermore, the mosaic includes a third elongated rectangular field on the east side, where, analogous to the lower (i.e., west) field, a garland is depicted. The (originally) central field is divided into three registers, of which only the two outer parts feature rectangular emblemata on a dark ground. The background of the central field, on the other hand, is light-colored; parts of an unidentifiable configuration point to a lost image. Not all original fragments are incorporated in their original place in the partial reconstruction. Thus the section of the rhombus frieze and the bead and reel that is placed at the edge of the lower garland field belongs to the framing of the upper garland register below the emblema of the tragic mask.
Pergamonmuseum, Berlin | Principal Floor | Telephos hall Parrot Mosaic Early To Mid-2nd Century BCDetails Unknown.jpg



Venus de Milo ()

La Vénus de Milo est une célèbre sculpture grecque de la fin de l'époque hellénistique (vers 130-100 av. J.-C.) qui pourrait représenter la déesse Aphrodite (Vénus pour les Romains). Découverte en 1820 sur l'île de Milo, d'où son nom, elle est actuellement conservée au musée du Louvre.
Cette statue date de l'époque hellénistique (grecque), vers 130-100 av. J.-C. Elle a d'abord été attribuée à tort à Praxitèle mais une inscription sur le socle montre qu'elle pourrait être l'œuvre d'Alexandre d'Antioche.
Venus de Milo. 130 BC-100 BC. Parian marble. h 2.02 m (6 1:2 ft). Louvre Museum, Paris.jpg



Victoire de Samothrace 190 BC ()

La Victoire de Samothrace (en grec ancien Νίκη της Σαμοθράκης / Níkê tês Samothrákês) est une sculpture grecque de l'époque hellénistique représentant la déesse Niké, personnification de la victoire, posée sur l'avant d'un navire.
La statue est découverte sur l'île de Samothrace, par Charles Champoiseau, vice-consul de France par intérim à Andrinople, au cours d'une mission d'exploration des ruines du sanctuaire sur la côte nord de l'île1. Le buste et le corps sont trouvés séparément, avec de nombreux fragments. Des fragments d'ailes, en particulier, permettent à Champoiseau d'identifier une représentation de Niké, la Victoire, traditionnellement représentée dans l'Antiquité grecque comme une femme ailée.
Winged Victory of Samothrace. c. 190 BC. Marble. h. 3.28 m (11 ft). Louvre Museum, Paris.jpg



AGMA - leda ()

Musee de l agora
agma - leda.jpg



delphes - colonne aux danseuses.jpg